Bee Pollen

By Steven Horne

As bees fly from flower to flower
collecting nectar to make honey, flower pollen collects on their legs. When this
is mixed with enzyme secretions, it forms the golden granules we call bee
pollen. In the hive, pollen is used to feed young bees, but it also makes a
nutritious food for human beings.

Bee
pollen
is considered a high energy, “super food” by many people in the
natural health field. It is considered a nutritive tonic in Chinese medicine.
There is some basis for this reputation because pollen is extremely rich in
nutrients. It is high in amino acids (protein) and contains all 22 amino acids,
making it a complete protein. In fact, it contains about 35-40% protein and
40-55% carbohydrates, along with fatty acids, vitamins and minerals and other
nutrients. It contains trace amounts of about 27 known minerals, numerous
vitamins, thousands of enzymes and many antioxidants. Some authors have gone so
far as to claim that bee pollen contains every nutrient the human body needs,
although I think it would be pretty boring to try to live off
it.


Bee
pollen is a tasty food, however. It has a sweet, slightly nutty flavor and
tastes good sprinkled on fruit salads, cereals or any dish where nuts would be
appropriate. It also tastes good straight. Because it’s such a good “food” herb,
bee pollen is often included in green drinks, such as NSP’s Ultimate GreenZone
and pH GreenZone.

Technically, bee
pollen isn’t really an herb, although it comes from plants. Because the bees
process the pollen, vegans consider it (and honey) to be animal foods, but I
still think of them as plant based foods, since they are only processed with
enzymes. Either way you look at it, bee pollen is an amazing substance. Each
teaspoon contains two and a half billion grains of flower pollen, a quantity
that would take one bee, working eight hours a day, a month to collect.

Bee pollen has many medicinal uses. It
is considered an energy and nutritive tonic and is often used in formulas for
energy and sports. This is why it is the primary ingredient in ENRG-V,
a formula for enhancing energy. It is also a minor ingredient in Target
Endurance
, another energy-enhancing blend.

Bee pollen capsules or bulk bee pollen
can be taken to help balance blood sugar and reduce food cravings. This means
that bee pollen can be helpful for diabetes, hypoglycemia and weight loss. It
combines very well with spirulina,
Super
Algae
or SF
for these purposes.

Bee pollen is also
an adrenal tonic. It is one of the herbs that may help correct reversed polarity
or pituitary gland problems. These uses have been figured out through muscle
response testing.

The most common
therapeutic use of bee pollen is for respiratory allergies. This is an almost
homeopathic way to use bee pollen, since one is taking a small amount of the
substance that actually triggers the allergic response. The best way to use bee
pollen for allergies is to obtain pollen from local beekeepers. That way, one is
ingesting the pollen from the same local flowers that trigger the allergies.
Another way to do this is to obtain raw, unfiltered honey which still contains
pollen granules from local beekeepers. However, if one can’t locate a source for
local pollen, the pollen in the capsules can still be helpful.

For allergies, start by taking just a
few granules of bee pollen each day (open up the capsule for this) and gradually
work up to 2-3 capsules per day. This helps the body slowly adapt to the pollen
and stops the hyper-reaction of the immune system that is causing the pollen
allergy. Occasionally, hypersensitive individuals will experience allergic
reactions to taking bee pollen internally. However, if one starts with just a
few grains these reactions are usually avoided.


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Posted: 04/01/2007 at 03:55 PM
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Posted: 04/01/2007 at 03:55 PM
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